mobile-menu mobile-menu-arrow Menu
Contact Us | T: 01557 330 223 |
Representative 0% APR

The Whitehouse Gallery

Basket ›
 
Free Delivery on Orders over £100*
GALLERY CLOSED DURING JANUARY: We shall reopen for our first exhibition in February
 
- View Works for sale -
Name: Lindsay Grime

Medium:Painting

Biography

Born in 1987, Lindsay Grime is a graduate of Edinburgh College of Art, where she studied illustration, graduating with a First Class honours in 2009. Since then she has worked as an illustrator on a diverse range of projects, including a graphic novel, packaging and illustrations for children’s magazines. Alongside this work, she has always enjoyed creating and exhibiting ‘illustrated’ objects, producing ceramic plates and jewellery and more recently, wooden boxes and trays, brightly painted with flora and fauna, graphic patterns and quirky human characters. Making paintings, which has now become her main focus, seemed like a natural extension of this, and has allowed Lindsay to develop and explore her own ideas and visual narratives, a kind of liberation in contrast to the commission-based nature of illustration work.

Statement

“Highly colourful and figurative, my work is infused with a longing for escapism, a desire to conjure up curious, dreamlike scenes in which we are not entirely sure what is taking place. Wild and joyful female figures people this alternate world, inviting the viewer to slip out of their everyday reality, if even for a moment, into a space of magic and strangeness, by turns intriguing and disconcerting. The human and animal characters of my painted world are untethered, expressing a certain fantastical connection to the natural world, a longing for freedom and delight.

I am influenced by the charming naivety of Henri Rousseau, with his lush forests and haunted animals, the floating figures of Marc Chagall, as well as by the touching beauty of icons of gothic art, and by Persian miniatures, infinitely appealing for their attention to detail and their flattened perspectives. My creative approach remains close to that of an illustrator; the starting point is always the sketchbook, filled with rapid, energetic pen sketches, which become the intermediary between my mind’s eye and the finished painting.”